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“Molecular Brain Imaging in Children”

Harry Chugani, MD, an internationally prominent neurologist, has joined Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children as Division Chief of Neurology within the Nemours Neuroscience Center. Dr. Chugani comes to Delaware from the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, where he established the nation’s first PET (positron emission technology) center in a children’s hospital and also served as chief of pediatric neurology and developmental pediatrics, and professor of pediatrics, neurology and radiology. Dr. Chugani’s research has been in the area of cerebral metabolism in brain development, epilepsy surgery aimed at stopping seizures, and the use of PET techniques in children.

A graduate of LaSalle College in Philadelphia and Georgetown University School of Medicine, Dr. Chugani trained in neurology and pediatric neurology at Georgetown. After fellowship, he joined the UCLA Medical Center faculty, where he served for 12 years as a tenured professor in neurology and pediatrics and completed additional training in nuclear medicine.

Dr. Chugani is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with special competency in child neurology. A distinguished practitioner, author, investigator and mentor, Dr. Chugani is a past president of the International Child Neurology Association. He is the recipient of numerous honors and invited lectureships including an invitation to the White House during the Clinton administration to discuss brain maturation and plasticity in learning. He has received more than $10 million in NIH grant awards.Harry Chugani, MD, an internationally prominent neurologist, has joined Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children as Division Chief of Neurology within the Nemours Neuroscience Center. Dr. Chugani comes to Delaware from the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University, where he established the nation’s first PET (positron emission technology) center in a children’s hospital and also served as chief of pediatric neurology and developmental pediatrics, and professor of pediatrics, neurology and radiology. Dr. Chugani’s research has been in the area of cerebral metabolism in brain development, epilepsy surgery aimed at stopping seizures, and the use of PET techniques in children. A graduate of LaSalle College in Philadelphia and Georgetown University School of Medicine, Dr. Chugani trained in neurology and pediatric neurology at Georgetown. After fellowship, he joined the UCLA Medical Center faculty, where he served for 12 years as a tenured professor in neurology and pediatrics and completed additional training in nuclear medicine. Dr. Chugani is certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology with special competency in child neurology. A distinguished practitioner, author, investigator and mentor, Dr. Chugani is a past president of the International Child Neurology Association. He is the recipient of numerous honors and invited lectureships including an invitation to the White House during the Clinton administration to discuss brain maturation and plasticity in learning. He has received more than $10 million in NIH grant awards.